Janice Hall Heck

Finding hope in a chaotic world…

Archive for the tag “Israel”

Cee’s Fun Foto: Wheels: Ancient, Old, New

Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Wheels

Mt. Nebo, Israel

Mt. Nebo, Israel

2012 Israel Trip 902

Granite block mover. Beit Shehan, Israel

Granite block mover. Beit Shehan, Israel

Old Town, San Diego

Old Town, San Diego

Biking in Florence, Italy

Biking in Florence, Italy

Florence, Italy

Florence, Italy

Rome, Italy

Rome, Italy

My wheels in Tuscany!

My wheels in Tuscany!

Wheels in Balboa Park, San Diego

Wheels in Balboa Park, San Diego

Always the bridesmaid, never the bride. Doodah Parade, Ocean City, NJ

Always the bridesmaid, never the bride. Doodah Parade, Ocean City, NJ

The Last Meow

HaHaHa. You can drive that old Mercedes. I’ll drive my hot pink car!

kitten in pink car

Meow for now. =<^;^>=

B & W Photo Challenge: Texture Mystery Solution

In this week’s B & W Photo Challenge, I posted this Texture Mystery Picture and asked if viewers could identify it.

Photo credit: Janice Heck

Photo credit: Janice Heck

Here is the full picture. Does this give you a better idea? And look: more textures to consider.

Photo credit: Janice Heck

Photo credit: Janice Heck  Bet She’An National Park, Israel

The mystery picture is a close-up of a what? cart? contraption? device?  Whatever you call it, it moves a heavy piece of quarried stone to the work site. The stone in this picture serves as the axle. The axle sits in a boxed cut-out in each wheel.   Layers of wood (and textures) form the wheels which you can see more clearly in the close-up picture. The square brace looks like both a handlebar for pushing and/or pulling and as a brake when the bottom brace hits the ground. The stone could be a paver for a Roman road or a building block for a temple, amphitheater, or palace.

Bet She'An  Photo credit: Janice Heck

Bet She’An   Colonnaded street leading to archaeological mound (tel).      Photo credit: Janice Heck

Bet She’An National Park is twenty miles south of the Sea of Galilee in the Lower Jordan Valley, Israel.

How did people in early civilizations build the pyramids? How did they build those incredible ancient cities? How did they build the roads that you see in so many historical cities in Greece, Rome, and the Middle East? Look at the number of paving blocks in this street. Imagine how many workers and carts it took to build this road and the bulkhead, the sidewalk, and columns.

Here’s one fascinating modern theory on how workers moved heavy stones and pillars in past ages before modern machinery: Man Moves Huge Blocks!

The Last Meow

Fascinating theory about how workers moved these heavy stones and pillars, but can I please take my nap now?

Photo credit: jaunted.com

Photo credit: jaunted.com

Meow for now.  =<^;^>=

Weekly Photo Challenge: Foreshadow. A Rooster Crows. Church of Saint Peter in Gallicantu, Jerusalem

The WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge for week of August 2, 2013: Post a photograph that evokes FORESHADOW to you.

Photo credit: Janice Heck  In the courtyard of The Church of Saint Peter in Gallicantu, Mount Zion, Jerusalem

Photo credit: Janice Heck. In the courtyard of The Church of Saint Peter in Gallicantu, Mount Zion, Jerusalem  (Gallicantu means “cock’s crow.”)

In the Bible, Jesus foreshadowed an event to come when he said:

I tell you, Peter, the rooster shall not crow this day before you will deny three times that you know me.

A tableau with Peter, a woman who questions Peter, a Roman soldier, and a rooster on a pillar above, portrays this well-known biblical scene of Peter denying that he knows Jesus.

Photo credit: Janice Heck Peter: "Woman, I know him not."

Photo credit: Janice Heck, Non novi illum. Luke 22:57
Peter: “Woman, I know him not.”

A shrine to Peter’s denial of Christ was built in 457 AD in this location (Mount Zion), but it was destroyed in 1010. It was rebuilt in 1102 by Crusaders, but that too was later destroyed. It was not rebuilt until 1931 when the Church of Saint Peter in Gallicantu was built. This tableau is in the courtyard of the church.

Here’s how others have interpreted “Foreshadow.”

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